Sport Bay of Plenty
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Voice of Rangatahi report

The aim of the 2021 Voice of Rangatahi survey was to gain insights into the physical activity patterns of Bay of Plenty rangatahi, and understand how they participate in and out of school.

Regional and national data shows time spent being active typically peaks at age 12 before dramatically declining and failing to rebound throughout a person’s life. A key strategic focus for Sport Bay of Plenty is therefore to support rangatahi aged 15 to 17 to be more active.

The Voice of Rangatahi report highlights:

VoR_tile
  • Weekly participation (based on time)
  • The activities rangatahi are currently doing or would like to try
  • Insights into the school environment such as communication methods, engagement in various physical activities at school and levels of satisfaction
  • Attitudes, barriers and experiences.

The survey had a sample size that overall represented 15 per cent of Waiariki-Bay of Plenty’s ranagatahi population. Seventeen per cent of Central Bay rangatahi were surveyed, 14.5 per cent across Western Bay of Plenty and 18 per cent in Eastern Bay. This was a statistically significant sample size with a 95% confidence level.

Thank you to the following schools for taking part: Aquinas College, Mount Maunganui College, Otumoetai College, Tauranga Girls’ College, John Paul College, Reporoa College, Rotorua Lakes High School, Tarawera High School, Edgecumbe College, Ōpōtiki College and Whakatāne High School.

Key findings:

  • Only 16 per cent of Bay of Plenty Rangatahi are meeting physical activity guidelines (active for at least 60 minutes every day)
  • Male rangatahi are far more likely to participate in physical activity compared to their female peers
  • Rangatahi physical activity levels decline in years 11, 12 and 13
  • Rangatahi mostly use passive transport (like a car or bus) to get to and from school
  • There is a high level of satisfaction with school P.E. and physical activities
  • 14 per cent of rangatahi would like to have a greater range of activities on offer at school
  • Activities that young people want (dance, tennis, workouts, trampoline and surfing) don’t feature as the top activities that rangatahi participate in at school
  • Young people are just as likely to be active with their friends during break time as they are to participate in one-off school events like athletics days
  • High levels of confidence, competence and motivation have big impacts on rangatahi’s physical activity levels.

Time spent being active

Only 16% of Waiariki–Bay of Plenty rangatahi are meeting physical activity guidelines.

Over the past 7 days, on how many days were you physically active for a total of at least 60 minutes per day?

Over the past 7 days, on how many days were you physically active for a total of at least 60 minutes per day?

Although higher than the national average of seven per cent, there is still a large proportion of rangatahi (84 per cent) who are not active enough to meet physical activity guidelines.

Six per cent of our region’s rangatahi are non-participants or inactive (0 days spent being active) - on par with national levels.

Time spent being active by gender

In line with national data, male rangatahi in the Bay of Plenty are far more likely than females to participate in physical activities every day.

Nearly seven per cent of females and 4.7 per cent of males don’t participate in any physical activity during the week. At the top end of participation (5 - 7 days active) males are more active than females in the Bay of Plenty (54 per cent of males versus 41 per cent of females).

_VoR_Time spent being active by gender (1)

Time spent being active by year level

Year 7 and 8 students are the most active (7 days active), and senior students in years 11, 12 and 13 have the highest proportion of non-participation/inactivity (0 days active).

_VoR_Time spent being active by year level

Time spent being active by sub-region

Participation does not vary greatly between Eastern, Central and Western Bay of Plenty, although Central Bay rangatahi are slightly more active overall.

The percentage of inactive students (0 days active) is also similar between regions, but Eastern Bay records the highest level at seven per cent.

VoR_Time spent being active by region

Transport to and from school

The majority of Waiariki-Bay of Plenty students use passive transport, like a car or bus, to get to and from school.

Walking is the most common form of active transport for Bay of Plenty rangatahi, followed by biking.

Transport BOP
Transport WBOP

Western Bay of Plenty

Transport EBOP

Eastern Bay of Plenty

Transport CBOP

Central Bay of Plenty

Types of activities

Both national and in Waiariki-Bay of Plenty games like four square, dodgeball and tag have the highest participation rates and are the most popular activities at school.

School influence

Schools can have a big influence on participation simply by offering the required equipment and facilities or by supporting a particular activity. Dance, tennis and workouts are of high interest to students but are not typically offered at schools and therefore do not have high participation.

In-school activities

Top activities (by participation) in school for BOP
rangatahi
  Top activities BOP rangatahi would like to try/participate in
at school
 
Games e.g. four sq, tag, dodgeball etc. 37.8% Games e.g. four sq, tag, dodgeball 27.5%
Cross-country 27.3% Volleyball 26.8%
Running/Jogging 23.7% Dance e.g. hip hop, ballet etc. 23.3%
Basketball 20.3% Tennis 22.9%
Netball 20% Badminton 22.6%
Volleyball 19.9% Workout e.g. weights or cardio 22.3%
Athletics 19.4% Netball 20.4%
Badminton 18.9% Basketball 18.8%
Hockey 18% Football/soccer 18.3%
Football/soccer 17.7% Trampoline 17.6%
Nothing during school year 15.4% Surfing 17.5%

Out of school activities

Top activities (by participation) outside of school for BOP rangatahi   Top activities BOP rangatahi would like to try/participate in outside of school  
Walking for fitness 29.3% Workout (weights or cardio) 21.2%
Workout (weights or cardio) 28.1% Dance/dancing 17.8%
Running or jogging 27.8% Volleyball 17.4%
Cycling/biking 26% Surfing 17.1%
Swimming 26% Tennis 15.8%
Dance/dancing 19.8% Swimming 15.7%
Tramping/bush walks 19.5% Skiing 15.1%
Mountain Biking 16.5% Skateboarding 14.5%
Tennis 13.2% Badminton 13.5%
Skateboarding 12.5% Walking for fitness 13.4%
Surfing 12.2% Tramping or bush walks 12.4%

Communication at school

Understanding how young people prefer to find out about activities is critical to making sure no one misses out.

We looked at how students currently find out about physical activities at their school and compared it to how they prefer to stay informed. The key takeaway – there is no one size fits all, and rangatahi like to hear about physical activity opportunities from many different sources.

Interestingly, even though a large proportion of students currently find out about opportunities from friends, it seems in future they would prefer to hear more via other methods.

How rangatahi currently find out about physical activity opportunities at school   How rangatahi would you like to find out about physical activity opportunities at school  
Notices 74.7% Notices 49.8%
Friends 58.5% Teachers 43%
Teachers 54.9% Email 38.1%
Assemblies 48.3% Form Class 37.7%
Form Class 42.3% Assemblies 34.1%
Email 32.1% Friends 32.8%
School Newsletter 27.1% School Newsletter 26.9%
P.E Noticeboard 19.4% School Social Media 23.7%
School Social Media 16.6% P.E Noticeboard 23.6%
School Website 13.8% School Website 21.9%
School Noticeboard 10.3% School App 19.8%
School App 9.1% School Noticeboard 17.7%
Student Reception 4.6% Student Reception 12.2%

Physical activity at school

P.E. is a curriculum requirement until Year 10 (14 years old at a minimum).

Therefore the most common way rangatahi participate in physical activity in the school setting is within curriculum/class time.

How students participate

9. How students participate.PNG

Satisfaction levels

11. Satisfaction with physical activities and P.E.
What is one thing you would like your school to improve? BOP % of total
Facilities e.g. changing rooms, toilets 32%
I wouldn’t improve anything 20%
Range of activities on offer 14%
Playing / training venues / fields / courts 8%
Development opportunities or programmes 5%
Quality of coaches or instructors 5%
Cost 5%
Other (please specify) 4%
Communications 4%
Timing of opportunities (e.g. trials, comps, training) 3%

The majority of Waiariki-Bay of Plenty rangatahi are satisfied to extremely satisfied with their physical activity and P.E experiences at school. When very and extremely satisfied responses are combined they account for approximately a third of all responses.

This level of satisfaction is also reflected in discussions around improvements students would like at school. Aside from improvements to school facilities, which is commonly cited by students throughout the country, the next highest response was ‘I wouldn’t improve anything’ followed by improving the range of activities on offer.

Attitudes towards physical activity

Engaging with young people, listening to what they want and then co-designing is key to lifting physical activity rates.

Attitudes towards physical activity are shaped by complex processes such as past experiences, the influence of friends and family and societal trends.

Rangatahi in Waiariki-Bay of Plenty understand the benefits of physical activity - 90 per cent of survey respondents said they understood why taking part in physical activity is good for them.

10. Attitudes towards physical activities

However, a much lower percentage of respondents feel like they have a say in physical activity or are encouraged to participate.

  • Only 49% of rangatahi feel like they have a say in what physical activities they do at school
  • Only 59% of rangatahi feel encouraged to be physically active by school staff.

Impacts on physical activity levels

The below table shows the link between high/low physical activity levels based on attitudes.

  High variable   Low variable
Attitude variables High physical activity level(4-7 days) Low physical activity level (0-3 days) High physical activity level (4-7 days)
Competence 45% 16% 6%
Motivation 51% 22% 4%
Value 58% 33% 1%
Confidence 43% 33% 9%
Involvement (i.e. have a say) 34% 16% 12%
Encouragement 39% 15% 6%
Positive environment 43% 19% 5%
  • Rangatahi that have a say in what physical activities they do are 2.83 times more likely to be highly active than those who feel they don’t have a say.
  • Rangatahi who feel competent enough to participate in physical activities are 7.5 times more likely to be highly active than those who report low competence
  • Rangatahi that are motivated to participate in physical activities are 12.75 times more likely to be highly active than those who report low motivation
  • Rangatahi that understand the value of participating in physical activities are 58 times more likely to be highly active than those who do not understand the value
  • Rangatahi that are confident to participate in physical activities are 4.77 times more likely to be highly active than those who report low confidence
  • Rangatahi that are have a say in what physical activities they do are 2.83 times more likely to be highly active than those who feel they don’t have a say
  • Rangatahi that are encouraged by school staff to participate in physical activities are 6.5 times more likely to be highly active than those who feel they are not encouraged
  • Rangatahi that perceive their school environment to be inclusive and safe to be physically active are 8.6 times more likely to be highly active than those who report low levels of inclusiveness and safety.
 

Want to know more?

Calvin Buttimore_Snippet

Calvin Buttimore

Active Young People Team Leader

calvinb@sportbop.co.nz

021 841 856

Lauren Nicholas - Insights and Evaluation Lead

Lauren Nicholas

Insights and Evaluation Lead

laurenn@sportbop.co.nz

027 314 8874

x3 May 2016

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